Traffic Tickets

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Traffic Tickets

Traffic in English is taken from the Arabic word taraffaqa, which means to walk along slowly together. Traffic on a public way may consist of heavy motor vehicles (for instance, car, truck), streetcars, other vehicle (for instance, moped, bicycle), pedestrians, ridden or herded animals, and other conveyances. Organized traffic generally has well-established priorities, lanes, right-of-way, and traffic control at intersections. Organized traffic has lanes, junctions, intersections, interchanges, traffic signals, or signs. Organization typically produces a better combination of travel safety and efficiency.

In this page we have tried to make a summary about driver-vehicle-traffic ticket issues. Here, you will find information on the following subjects:

  • Traffic
  • Highway Traffic Act
  • Traffic Tickets
  • Demerit Point System
  • Driver / Vehicle Related Convictions
  • How a paralegal can help you with your traffic ticket

Events which disrupt the flow and may cause traffic to degenerate into a disorganized mess include: road construction, collisions and debris in the roadway. On particularly busy freeways, a minor disruption may persist in a phenomenon known as traffic waves. A complete breakdown of organization may result in traffic jams.

Driving on the Right Side of the Road

In Ontario, as well as in Canada and US, vehicles must drive on the right side of the road. On multi-lane highways, the furthest left lane is the passing lane and is often designated for drivers whose speed is higher than those driving in the right lane.

Express and Collectors

On some Ontario highways, like the 401, the 407 and the 404, the highway is divided into an Express section and a Collectors section. Express lanes and collector lanes are a set of two same-direction one-way multi-lane roadways. The outer set is usually called Collectorsand provides access to most or all interchanges. The inner set is called Express and provides for non-exiting traffic. The Express has fewer exit and entry points than the Collectors, and cars typically drive at a higher speed in these lanes. Multiple exit routes are gathered together in the Express, allowing for these fewer exit and entry points. When exiting the Express lanes, drivers are exited back to the Collectors lanes, where they choose their specific exit.

On Highway 427 in Toronto, the express lanes are intended for traffic passing through the area and exclusively have the ramps to other highways, while the collector lanes are designed strictly to serve interchanges within that area.

Another main purpose of having a collector-express system is to “squeeze” two highways into one corridor. Often the collector lanes serve primarily as the direct connectors or ramp extensions, and the express lanes are designed for “through traffic”. Highway ramps or transfers usually connect the local and express lanes. If one highway ramp crosses over another, the result is known as a braid or basket weave.

HIGHWAY TRAFFIC ACT

Traffic laws are the laws which govern traffic and regulate vehicles, while rules of the road are both the laws and the informal rules that may have developed over time to facilitate the orderly and timely flow of traffic.

The Highway Traffic Act (HTA) is an Ontario Act which regulates the licensing of vehicles, classification of traffic offenses, administration of loads, classification of vehicles and other transport related issues. First introduced in 1923 to deal with increasing accidents during the early years of motoring in Ontario, there have been amendments due to changes to driving conditions and new transportation trends. The latest revision (2009) to the act was added to ban use of cell phones in cars.

Permits

According to the Highway Traffic Act, no person shall drive a motor vehicle on a highway without valid permit for the vehicle that has to be displayed on the vehicle in the prescribed manner. The number plate has to be issued in accordance with the regulations showing the number of the permit issued for the vehicle.

Licence/License

Driving is a privilege, not a right. The privilege of driving on a highway is granted to, and retained by, only those persons who demonstrate that they are likely to drive safely. No person shall drive a motor vehicle on a highway unless the motor vehicle is within a class of motor vehicles in respect of which the person holds a driver’s licence issued to him or her.

Every passenger-plated vehicle has to have mandatory insurance. Effective November 29, 2010, Ontario will electronically verify with the Insurance Bureau of Canada, if a passenger-plated vehicle has mandatory insurance coverage during the licence plate renewal process. In addition, every commercial motor vehicle has to have Liability insurance that is being used to transport goods for compensation.

Authority

The Highway Traffic Act gives Ontario police officers the legal power to direct traffic when they find it appropriate. It also gives the Ministry of Transportation power to make regulations regarding posting of signs and traffic control devices.

Speed Limit

The Highway Traffic Act sets speed limits: on most Ontario highways the speed limit is 100km/hour; within a local municipality or a built-up area the speed limit is 50km/hour. In some areas, 80km/hour is the limit. The rate in school zones and construction zones also differ. The speed limit would be as posted within that particular area of highway. For school zones, 150m of the road to and from the entrance or exit of a school is usually designated for lower speed limits when the school is active.

Toll Roads

Highway 407 Express Toll Route (ETR) is the only toll road in Ontario. It runs 108km in length but has more than 1,070km of lanes, according to the 407 ETR official website. The 407 is run electronically. As you drive onto the 407, an overhead gantry automatically records the beginning and end of your trip. This information is used to calculate the cost of your drive through the highway. Drivers who often use the 407 may sometimes have transponders, a small electronic device that saves driver’s money on toll charges.

The Highway Traffic Act also sets the laws and rules on the following:

  • Rules of the road
  • Equipment
  • Medical transportation services
  • Civil proceedings
  • Suspension for failure to pay judgments or meet support obligations
  • Records and reporting of accidents and convictions
  • Photo-radar system evidence
  • Red light camera system evidence
  • Procedure, arrests and penalties

TRAFFIC TICKETS

A traffic ticket is a notice issued by a law enforcement official to a driver (motorist) or other road user, accusing violation (offence) of traffic laws. Although direct operation of a bicycle and a mounted animal are commonly referred to as riding, such operators are legally considered drivers and are required to obey the rules of the road.

Traffic tickets generally come in form citing a moving violation, for example, exceeding the speed limit. The tickets issued for a non-moving violation, such as a wrong parking, are called parking tickets.

A traffic ticket constitutes a notice that a penalty, such as a fine or deduction of points, or both, has been or will be assessed against the driver or owner of a vehicle. Failure to pay generally leads to prosecution or to civil recovery proceedings for the fine. In others, the ticket constitutes only a citation and summons to appear at traffic court, with a determination of guilt to be made only in court.

In Canada, traffic laws are made at the provincial level. Some serious violations are considered criminal (such as Drinking and Driving) and are located under the Criminal Code of Canada.

Each province maintains a database of drivers, including their convicted traffic offence. Upon being ticketed, a driver has a chance to plead guilty, guilty with an explanation or not guilty. To do so, the driver or their representative (a Lawyer/Paralegal) must attend the court for the town or city in which the violation took place. The back of the ticket states the driver has up to 15 days to enter their pleas.

If the driver pleads not guilty, a trial date is set and both the driver, or a Lawyer/Paralegal representing the driver, and the ticketing police officer, are required to attend. If the police officer fails to attend, the court judge will often find in favour of the driver and dismiss the charge, although sometimes the trial date is moved to give the police officer another chance to attend.

The court will also make provisions for the officer or the prosecutor to achieve a deal with the driver, often in the form of a plea bargain. If no agreement is reached, both driver and police officer, or their representatives, formally attempt to prove their case before the judge or Justice of The Peace, who then decides the matter.

If the driver pleads guilty, the outcome is equivalent to conviction after trial. Upon conviction, the driver is generally fined a monetary amount and, for moving violations, is additionally given demerit points, under Ontario Demerit Point System. Jail time is sometimes sought in more serious cases such as racing or stunt driving.

If a driver is convicted, he or she must accept the penalties or try to appeal the ruling. An appeal will typically only be granted in cases where there were errors in the law or proceedings.

If a trial date takes more than a reasonable amount of time, and the accused had nothing to delay it, a Charter of Rights violation can be filed and pleaded. The reasonable length of time changes from court to court. In most cases, this is typically 1 year. A Charter of Rights Violation must be filed with the Attorney General of Ontario and with the courts themselves and then argued on the court date.

Four (4) Digit ICON numbers on your Traffic Ticket or Notice:

Often, motorists receive Yellow Offence Notices or Notice of Fine and Due Date or a Red Light Camera Offence Notice and are not sure who to talk to or where they should go to Request a Trial Date to contest their tickets. Often there is a sequence of numbers on the ticket or notice which can aid a motorist in locating the office responsible for their tickets. On a Yellow Offence Notice – look at the top left hand corner and you will see a four (4) digit ICON number. On a Notice of Fine & Due Date Notice or a Red Light Camera Offence Notice – look at the first four (4) digits of the Offence Number – this is the four (4) digit ICON number. After you have identified those four (4) digits, review this list of ICON numbers. You will find the four (4) digit ICON number, the corresponding Provincial Offence Office and corresponding phone numbers.

DEMERIT POINTS SYSTEM

This is an overview of Ontario demerit point system for your information but please note that it’s an unofficial version.

No doubts, you know that traffic violation convictions usually come with demerit points against your licence. Drivers convicted of certain driving-related offences have demerit points recorded on their records. It is a common misconception that drivers “lose” points due to convictions for certain traffic offences. In fact, a driver begins with zero demerit points and accumulates demerit points for convictions. Demerit points stay on your record for 2 years from the offence date. If you collect enough points, you can lose your driver’s licence.

In the Regulation 339/94 of the Highway Traffic Act, “accumulated demerit points” means the total demerit points in a person’s record acquired as a result of offences committed within any period of two years. “Conviction” includes a plea of guilty or a finding of guilt.

If a resident of Ontario is convicted or forfeits bail in another province or territory of Canada or in one of the states of the United States of America for an offence that, in the opinion of the Registrar, is in substance and effect equivalent to an offence for which demerit points would be recorded upon conviction in Ontario, the Registrar may record the demerit points for the conviction as if the conviction had been entered or the bail forfeited in Ontario for the equivalent offence.

Although, the demerit points have no direct impact on insurance rate they can affect it indirectly. Insurance rates and eligibility are typically measured by the number of tickets received in recent years.

Driver’s licence/license suspension

The demerit points are used by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario to determine licence suspensions due to repeated traffic violations. Ontario allows the suspension of driver’s licenses for child support arrears through the FRO; job loss, and any other reasonable excuses, including the need for a licence to work, are routinely ignored, and you can expect to be jailed for up to 6 months immediately following your licence suspension. If caught driving with a suspended license, the vehicle you are driving will be impounded for 7-days.

If a person is convicted of an offence or two or more offences arising out of the same circumstances and the penalty imposed by the court includes a period of licence suspension, no demerit points shall be recorded.

If a person is convicted of two or more offences arising out of the same circumstances and the penalty imposed by the court does not include a period of licence suspension, demerit points shall only be recorded for the conviction carrying the greatest number of points.

Demerit Point System

(The Regulation 339/94 of the Highway Traffic Act)

Demerit points

Offence

7 Points
  • Failing to remain at the scene of a collision
  • Failing to stop when signaled / requested by a police officer

 

6 Points
  • Careless Driving
  • Exceeding the speed limit by 50km/h or more
  • Racing
  • Failing to stop for a school bus

 

5 Points
  • Driver of a bus failing to stop at an unprotected railway crossing

 

4 Points
  • Exceeding the speed limit by 30 to 49km/h
  • Following too closely

 

3 Points
  • Exceeding the speed limit by 16 to 29km/h
  • Driving through, around or under a railway crossing barrier
  • Failing to yield the right-of-way
  • Failing to obey a stop sign, traffic control stop/slow sign, traffic light or railway crossing signal
  • Failing to obey the directions of a police officer
  • Driving the wrong way on a divided road
  • Failing to report a collision to a police officer
  • Improper driving when road is divided into lanes
  • Crowding the driver’s seat
  • Going the wrong way on a one-way road
  • Driving or operating a vehicle on a closed road
  • Crossing a divided road where no proper crossing is provided
  • Failing to slow and carefully pass a stopped emergency vehicle
  • Failing to move, where possible, into another lane when passing a stopped emergency vehicle
  • Improper passing
  • Improper use of high occupancy vehicle lane

 

2 Points
  • Improper opening of a vehicle door
  • Prohibited turns
  • Towing people – on toboggans, bicycles, skis, etc.
  • Failing to obey signs
  • Failing to stop at a pedestrian crossing
  • Failing to share the road
  • Improper right turn
  • Improper left turn
  • Failing to signal
  • Unnecessary slow driving
  • Reversing on a divided high-speed road
  • Driver failing to wear a seat belt
  • Driver failing to ensure that a passenger less than 23kg is properly secured
  • Driver failing to ensure that a passenger under 16 years is wearing a seat belt
  • Failing to lower headlamp beams
  • Backing on a highway
  • Driver failing to ensure infant/child passenger is properly secured in an appropriate child restraint system or booster seat

 

Demerit Points and New Drivers

  • As a Class G1, G2, M1 or M2 driver, if you get two or more demerit points, you will be sent a warning letter.
  • At six points, you may have to go to an interview to discuss your record and give reasons why your licence should not be suspended. If you don’t attend, your licence may be suspended.
  • At nine points, your licence will be suspended for 60 days from the date you surrender it to the Ministry of Transportation. You can lose your licence for up to two years if you fail to surrender your licence. A driver’s licence may be surrendered at any ServiceOntario Driver and Vehicle Licence Issuing Office, ServiceOntario College Park Driver and Vehicle Licence Issuing Office, or mailed to:
Ministry of Transportation
Driver Improvement Office
Building A, Main Floor
2680 Keele Street
Downsview, ON M3M 3E6
  • DriveTest Centres do not accept surrendered licences for suspension purposes.
  • After the suspension, the number of points on your record will be reduced to four. Any additional points could again bring you to the interview level. If you reach nine points again, your licence can be suspended for six months from the date you surrender it to the Ministry of Transportation.
  • Note: If you are a novice driver and are convicted of violating any novice condition or a Highway Traffic Act offence which carries 4 or more demerit points or receive a court-ordered suspension for an offence that would have resulted in 4 or more demerit points, you will receive the appropriate penalty under the Novice Driver Escalating Sanctions program. However, no demerit points will be applied to your record or be counted towards your demerit point total

Demerit Points and Fully Licensed Drivers

  • As a fully licensed driver, if you get 6 demerit points, you will be sent a warning letter.
  • At 9 points, you may have to go to an interview to discuss your record and give reasons why your licence should not be suspended. If you don’t attend, your licence may be suspended.
  • At 15 or more points, your licence will be suspended for 30 days from the date you surrender it to the Ministry of Transportation for the first suspension. You can lose your licence for up to two years if you fail to surrender your licence. A driver’s licence may be surrendered at any ServiceOntario Driver and Vehicle Licence Issuing Office, ServiceOntario College Park Driver and Vehicle Licence Issuing Office, or mailed to:
Ministry of Transportation
Driver Improvement Office
Building A, Main Floor
2680 Keele Street
Downsview, ON M3M 3E6
  • DriveTest Centres do not accept surrendered licences for suspension purposes.
  • After the suspension, you may be required to complete a driver re-examination (vision, knowledge and road tests). If you successfully fulfill your requirements you will have your driver’s licence reinstated and the number of points on your record will be reduced to seven. Any extra points could again bring you to the interview level. If you reach 15 points again, your licence will be suspended for six months.
  • If you receive a conviction for an offence committed while a novice driver that is eligible for sanctions under the novice driver escalating sanctions program but you now hold a full class G driver’s licence, you will be required to serve the following:
    • 30-day licence suspension for the first occurrence;
    • 90-day licence suspension for the second occurrence; and
    • 90-day licence suspension for the third occurrence.

Demerit Points for Out-of-Province Convictions

  • Drivers convicted of a driving related offence in the State of New York, the State of Michigan or any Canadian province or territory, will have home jurisdictional penalties such as demerit points and/or suspensions applied to their Ontario driver record as if the offence occurred in Ontario.
  • Examples of out-of-province convictions where Ontario demerit points and /or suspensions will be applied include:

Traffic

Criminal

  • Speeding
  • Fail to obey stop sign
  • Fail to obey signal light
  • Fail to stop for school bus
  • Racing
  • Fail to remain or return to the scene of a collision
  • Careless driving
  • Motor manslaughter
  • Criminal negligence
  • Dangerous driving
  • Failure to remain at scene of a collision
  • Impaired Driving
  • Driving while disqualified or prohibited

The Ontario Registrar of Motor Vehicles is required to keep these records under Section 205 of the Highway Traffic Act and may use them for the purposes of administering the Ministry’s Demerit Point System. Inquiries should be directed to:

Licensing Administration Office
Ministry of Transportation
Main Floor, Building A
2680 Keele Street
Downsview, ON M3M 3E6
Tel: 416-235-2999 or 1-800-387-3445

DRIVER / VEHICLE RELATED CONVICTIONS

According to Ontario Road Safety Annual Report (2008) of the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario released the following conviction data:

Summary of Motor Vehicle Related Convictions

Convictions* Number
Highway Traffic Act (HTA) 1,305,599
Regulations under the HTA 14,235
Criminal Code of Canada** 16,938
Motor Vehicle Collision Claim/Compulsory Insurance Act 85,738
Motorized Snow Vehicles Act 1,639
Off-Road Vehicles Act 1,744
Out of Province Exchange (HTA) 27,928
Others*** 392
Total 1,454,214

*Includes manually recorded convictions.

**This figure does not include 709 convictions for young offenders under the Criminal Code.

***Others may include acts not listed above, such as Motor Vehicle Safety Act.

Motor Vehicle Convictions Related to the Highway Traffic Act

Convictions Number
Equipment 25,155
Administrative* 174,716
Seat Belt (Driver & Passenger)** 65,415
Other Non-Pointable Convictions 70,684
Speeding 813,026
Other Pointable Convictions (2–4 pts) 133,361
Other Pointable Convictions (5–7 pts) 10,921
Driving While Suspended 12,321
Total 1,305,599

*Non-moving, weight, vehicle registration, licence renewal, etc.

**Failure to wear seat belt convictions registered against passengers over 16 are no longer included.

Motor Vehicle Convictions Related to the Criminal Code

Convictions Number
Alcohol Related** 12,723
Criminal Negligence 20
Fail to Remain at Collision 539
Fail to Stop for Police Officer 471
Driving While Disqualified 1,862
Dangerous Driving 1,321
Motor Manslaughter 2
Total 16,938

*Does not include 709 convictions for young offenders.

**Includes some out-of-province convictions.

Number of Convicted Drivers* with Criminal Code

Conviction Type Number
Criminal Negligence 7
Fail to Remain 299
Dangerous Driving 640
Impaired Driving 3,829
Blood/Alcohol over .08 2,862
Fail to Provide Breath Sample 462
Driving While Disqualified 1,163
Undefined 321
Total 9,585

*The same driver may be represented in this table more than once.

How a paralegal can help you with your traffic ticket

Some drivers seek assistance from a paralegal that specialize in defending traffic ticket cases. NOTE: A paralegal has to be licensed by the Law Society of Upper Canada.

Remember, paying the fine is an admission of guilt. There will be a conviction registered in your driver records. You will have no chance to lower your traffic ticket fine and demerit points (if any). Do not forget, if you have a conviction record, your auto insurance will be increased upon renewal. Calculate the cost of fighting a traffic ticket and weigh it against the chances of getting it dismissed or reduced to a lower charge.

It is always a good idea to hire a paralegal to fight your traffic ticket because we save your nerves, time & money.

  • A paralegal has experience and knowledge; they know how to fight your traffic ticket.
  • If you hire a paralegal to fight your traffic ticket, they will come to the hearing instead of you, and you will not be involved in a stressful process.
  • You will avoid standing in line, finding and paying for parking and gas in order to travel to the provincial offences court just to request a trial date. A paralegal will request a trial date for your traffic ticket.
  • You will not have to ask for a day off at work just to request a trial date for your traffic ticket and then to attend the hearing.
  • There will be no need to make a request to change a date of the hearing for your traffic ticket, if you cannot attend it at the date – a paralegal can.
  • If you have got a traffic ticket while far from home, a paralegal can handle your case without you having to travel to the court at that location.
  • A paralegal will develop the strategy of your defence. If there is an outstanding error on your traffic ticket, they may be able to build your defence on that. Probably, your defence will be based on exceptional circumstances that lead to the issuing of your traffic ticket. In some cases (for example, an obscured road sign or malfunctioning stoplight), it is reasonable to admit guilt without harming your traffic ticket case.
  • There is a legal requirement that radar guns need to be recalibrated in a certain period of time. In reality, sometimes they are not. Paralegals know legal procedures of verifying whether this was done and documented.
  • The police officer who issued you the traffic ticket must show up at the court hearing for your traffic ticket. If the police officer fails to show, your case will be dismissed. Often, the police officers schedule many court hearings on a certain day so that they can appear for all of them at once. If you have a good reason to change a date, there might be a chance that the officer won’t show up. You need to make your request in writing a few days in advance of the scheduled hearing.
  • Paralegals make sure that all evidences are well-organized for your traffic ticket case.
  • Often, paralegal talks to the Prosecutor before the hearing and they are able to come out with a good deal such as: lower a fine or decrease the demerit points or both, pay a fine without incurring the demerit points on your licence.
  • It always takes time and needs knowing the legal procedures to get necessary information (for example, disclosure) to fight your traffic ticket. Paralegals request this information in advance to develop the best strategy for fighting your traffic ticket.

ONTARIO PROVINCIAL OFFENCES COURT (Ontario Court of Justice) LOCATIONS

There are 55 Provincial Offence Court offices throughout Ontario, which deal with Highway Traffic Act matters and the Provincial Offences Act. The offices below have been listed alphabetically:

Barrie/Orillia Provincial Offences Court

56 Mulcaster Street,
Barrie, Ontario
L4M 3M3
Tel: 705-739-4291, Fax: 705-739-4292

Belleville Provincial Offences Court

235 Pinnacle Street– 1st Floor, Room # 104
Postal Bag 4400
Belleville, Ontario K8N 3A9
Tel: (613) 966-0331, Fax: (613) 966-7045
Toll Free: 1-800-510-3306
POA Courtroom is located on the 3rd Floor

Bomanville Provincial Offences Court

132 Church Street North
Bomanville, Ontario

Brampton Provincial Offences Court

5 Ray Lawson Avenue,
Brampton, Ontario
L6Y 5L7
Tel: 905-450-4770

Brantford Provincial Offences Court

102 Wellington Square,
Brantford, Ontario
N3T 5R7
Tel: 519-751-9100, Fax: 519-751-0404

Brockville Provincial Offences Court

41 Court House Square,
Brockville, Ontario
K6V 7N3
Tel: 613-342-2357, Fax: 613-342-8891

Bruce County Provincial Offences Court

215 Cayley Street
Walkerton, Ontario
N0G 2V0

Burlington Provincial Offences Court

(serves Milton, Oakville & Burlington)
2051 Plains Road East,
Burlington, Ontario
L7R 5A5
Tel: 905-637-1274, Fax: 905-637-5919

Caledon Provincial Offences Court

6311 Old Church Road,
Caledon East, Ontario
L0N 1E0
Tel: 905-584-2273, Fax: 905-584-2861
Toll Free Phone 1-800-303-2546

Cambridge Provincial Offence Court

152 Main Street,
Cambridge, Ontario
N1R 6R1
Tel: 519-740-5796, Fax: 519-622-4081

Cayuga Provincial Offences Court

45 Munsee Street North,
P.O. Box 220,
Cayuga, Ontario
N0A 1E0
Tel: 905-772-3327, Fax: 905-772-5810

Chatam-Kent Provincial Offences Court

21633 Communication Road, R.R. # 5
Blenheim, Ontario
N0P 1A0

Cochrane Provincial Offences Court

149 4th Ave, P.O. Box 2069
Cochrane, Ontario
P0L 1C0
Tel: 705-272-2538

Cornwall Provinical Offences Court

(serving United Counties of Stormount, Dundas and Glengarry, Alexandria and Morrisburg)
26 Pitt Street, 3rd Floor
Cornwall, Ontario
K6J 3P2
Tel: 613-933-4301

County of Grey Provincial Offences Court

(Owen Sound and Walkerton)
595 – 9th Avenue East
Owen Sound, Ontario
N4K 3E3
Tel: 519-376-2205

County of Haldimand Provincial Offences Court

(Cayuga)
45 Munsee Street North
Cayuga, Ontario
N0A 1E0
Tel: 905-772-3327

Elgin-St. Thomas Provincial Offences Court

450 Sunset Drive
St. Thomas, Ontario
N5R 5V1
Tel: 519-631-1460

Elliot Lake Provincial Offences Court

100 Tudhope
Suite 4
Espanola, Ontario
P5T 1S6
Tel: 705-862-7875

Elmdale Provincial Offences Court

Knox Building
35 Queen Street West,
Elmdale, Ontario
L0L 1P0
Tel: 705-739-4241, Fax: 705-739-4292

Espanola Provincial Offences Court

100 Tudhope Street
Suite 4
Espanola, Ontario
P5T 1S6

Fort Erie Provincial Offences Court

200 Jarvis Street,
Fort Erie, Ontario
L2A 2S4
Tel: 905-871-8811
Niagara Falls Office 905-371-9855

FortFrances Provincial Offences Court

320 Portage Avenue
Fort Frances, Ontario
P3A 3P9
Tel: 807-274-1676

Gore Bay Provincial Offences Court

15 Water Street, P.O. Box 298
Gore Bay, Ontario
P0P 1H0
Tel: 705-282-2837

Guelph Provincial Offences Court

55 Wyndham Street North
Old Quebec Street (Mall), Suite 215
Guelph, Ontario
N1H 7T8
Tel: 519-826-0762, Fax: 519-826-0284

Haileybury Provincial Offences Court

451 Meridian Avenue
P.O. Box 2050
Haileybury, Ontario
P0J 1K0
Tel: 705-672-3221

Hamilton Provincial Offences Court

John Sopinka Courthouse
45 Main Street East, Suite 408,
Hamilton, Ontario
L8N 2B7
Tel: 905-540-5593, Fax: 905-540-5730

Huron & Goderich County Provincial Offences Court

1 Courthouse Square,
Goderich, Ontario
N7A 1M2
Tel: 519-524-8394, Fax: 519-524-2044

Kawartha Lakes & Lindsay Provincial Offences Courts

440 Kent Street West, Lower Level
Lindsay, Ontario
K9V 5P2
Tel: 705-324-3962, Fax: 519-661-1944

Kemptville Provincial Offences Court

15 Water Street,

Kemptville, Ontario

Tel: 613-342-5003

Kenora Provincial Offences Court

1 Main Street South,
Kenora, Ontario
P9N 3X2
Tel: 807-467-2984, Fax: 807-467-8530

Kingston Provincial Offences Court

McDonald Cartier Building
279 Wellington Street,
Kingston, Ontario
K7K 6E1
Tel: 613-547-8557, Fax: 613-547-8558

Kitchener Provincial Offences Court

77 Queen Street North,
Kitchener, Ontario
N2H 2H1
Tel: 519-745-9446, Fax: 519-745-0520

Leeds and Grenville Provincial Offences Court

32A Wall Street,
Brockville, Ontario
K6V 4R9
Tel: 613-342-2357, Fax: 613-342-3968

Lindsay Provincial Offences Court

440 Kent Street West, Lower Level,
Lindsay, Ontario
K9V 5P2
Tel: 705-324-3962, Fax: 519-661-1944

London Provincial Offences Court

824 Dundas Street,
London, Ontario
N5W 5R1
Tel: 519-661-1882, Fax: 519-661-1944

L’Original Provincial Offences Court

28 rue Court Street, C.P. P.O. Box 347,
L’Original, Ontario
Tel: 613-675-4661, Fax: 613-675-4940
Toll Free Phone: 1-800-667-6307

Milton Provincial Offences Court

100 Nipissing Road,
Milton, Ontario
L9T 5B2
Tel: 905-876-2025, Fax: 905-876-0586

Mississauga Provincial Offences Court

950 Burnhamthorpe Road West,
Mississauga, Ontario
L3C 3B4
Tel: 905-615-4500

Napanee Provincial Offences Court

County Memorial Building
41 Dundas Street East,
Napanee, Ontario
K7R 1H7
Tel: 613-354-4882, Fax: 613-354-3112

Newmarket Provincial Offences Court

465 Davis Drive, Suite 200
Newmarket, Ontario
L3Y 7T9
Tel: 905-898-0425, Toll Free: 1-877-331-3309
Toll Free Phone: 1-877-331-3309

Niagara Falls Provincial Offences Court

(serves St. Catherines, Welland and Niagara Falls)
4635 Queen Street,
Niagara Falls, Ontario
L2E 6V6
Tel: 905-371-8988, Fax: 905-371-9855
Toll Free Phone: 1-866-278-8303

Norfolk Provincial Offences Court

Justice Complex
530 Queensway Avenue West, 4th Floor
P.O. Box 473,
Simcoe, Ontario
N3Y 4L2
Tel: 519-428-2494, Fax: 519-428-4291

Northumberland County Provincial Offences Court

860 William Street Upper Level,
Coburg, Ontario
K9A 3A9
Tel: 905-372-3329, Fax: 905-372-6529
Toll Free Phone: 1-800-354-7050

Oakville Provincial Offences Court

1225 Trafalgar Road, P.O. Box 206,
Oakville, Ontario
L6J 5A2
Tel: 905-338-4394, Fax: 905-338-4257

Orangeville Provincial Offence Court

10 Louisa Street
Orangeville, Ontario
L9W 3P9
Tel: 519-941-5808,Fax: 519-940-3685

Orillia Provincial Offences Court

575 West Street South,
Orillia, Ontario
L3V 7N6
Tel: 705-326-2960, Fax: 705-326-3613

Oshawa-Durham Provincial Offences Court

701 Rossland Road East, Lower Level
Whitby, Ontario
L1N 8Y9
Tel: 905-668-3130

Ottawa Provincial Offences Court

100 Constellation Crescent, 1st Floor,
Ottawa, Ontario
K2G 6J8
Tel: 705-326-2960, Fax: 705-326-3613
Toll Free Phone: 1-800-724-2913

Owen Sound Provincial Offences Court

595 9th Avenue East,
Owen Sound, Ontario
N4K 3E3
Toll Free Phone: 1-800-724-2913

Penetanguishene County Provincial Offences Court

Town Hall, 10 Robert West,
Penetanguishene, Ontario
Tel: 705-739-4291, Fax: 705-739-4292

Perth Provincial Offences Court

80 Gore Street
Perth, Ontario
K7H 1H9
Tel: 613-267-3311

Peterborough Provincial Offences Court

99 Simcoe Street,
Peterborough, Ontario
K9H 2H3
Tel: 705-742-7777, Fax: 705-743-9292

Prince Edward County Provincial Offences Court

#1, 67 King Street,
Picton, Ontario
K0K 2T0
Tel: 613-476-2148

Richmond Hill Provincial Offences Court

50 High Tech Road,
Richmond Hill, Ontario
L4B 4N7
Tel: 905-762-2105
Toll Free Phone: 1-866-758-0750

Sarnia Provincial Offences Court

Bayside Mall
Lambton Shared Services Centre, 2nd Floor
150 North Christina Street, Suite Y01A,
Sarnia, Ontario
N7T 7W5
Tel: 519-344-8880, Fax: 519-344-9379

St. Catharines Provincial Offences Court

71 King Street,
St. Catherines, Ontario
L2R 3H7
Tel: 905-687-6590, Fax: 905-687-6614

Stratford, Perth County Provincial Offences Court

1 Huron Street,
Stratford, Ontario
N5A 5S4
Tel: 519-271-0531

Sudbury Provincial Offences Court

178 Elm Street West
Station “A” P.O. Box 6800
Sudbury, Ontario
P3C 1V1
Tel: 705-673-6202

Thunder Bay Provincial Offences Court

110 Archibald Street North
Thunder Bay, Ontario
P7C 3X8
Tel: 807-625-2999

Timmins Provincial Offences Court

220 Algonquin Boulevard East
Timmins, Ontario
P4N 1B3
Tel: 705-360-1332

Toronto – Ontario Court of Justice # 4871

70 Centre Avenue
Toronto, Ontario M5G 1R5

Toronto Court Services

137 Edward Street, 2nd Floor
Toronto, Ontario
M5G 2P8
Tel: 416-338-7320, Fax: 416-338-7388

Toronto – Old City Hall – Provincial Offences Court

60 Queen Street West,
Toronto, Ontario
M5H 2M4
Tel: 416-327-5614

Toronto East Provincial Offences Court

1530 Markham Road,
Scarborough, Ontario
M1B 3G4
Tel: 416-338-7320, Fax:416-338-7388

Toronto North Provincial Offences Court

North York Civic Centre
5100 Yonge Street,
North York, Ontario
M2N 5V7
Tel: 416-338-7320, Fax: 416-338-7388

Toronto West Provincial Offences Court

York Civic Centre
2700 Eglinton Avenue West,
Toronto, Ontario
M6M 1V1
Tel: 416-338-7320, Fax: 416-338-7388

Wasaga Beach Provincial Offences Court

30 Lewis Street
Wasaga Beach, Ontario L9Z 1A1
Tel: 705-739-4241, Fax: 705-739-4292

Waterloo Provincial Offences Court

(through the Cambridge and Kitchener Courts)

77 Queen Street North
Kitchener, Ontario
N2H 6P4
Tel: 519-740-5794

Welland Provincial Offences Court

3 Cross Street,
Welland, Ontario
L3B 5X6
Tel: 905-734-6387, Fax: 905-734-7816
Toll Free Phone: 1-800-756-9477

Whitby Provincial Offences Court

701 Rossland Road East, Lower Level
Whitby, Ontario
L1N 8Y9
Tel: 519-537-4890

Windsor Provincial Offences Court

251 Goyeau Street, Suite 300,
Windsor, Ontario
N9A 6V2
Tel: 519-255-6555, Fax: 519-255-6556

Woodstock Provincial Offences Court

415 Hunter Street,
Woodstock, Ontario
N4S 4G6
Tel: 519-537-4890

One more time: paying the fine is an admission of guilt. There will be a conviction registered in your driver records. You will have no chance to lower your traffic ticket fine and demerit points (if any). Do not forget, if you have a conviction record, your auto insurance will be increased upon renewal. Calculate the cost of fighting a traffic ticket and weigh it against the chances of getting it dismissed or reduced to a lower charge.

Happy driving!

 

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